New Journal

Signature with 9x12 envelope
Signature with 9×12 envelope

I’m taking an on-line class, 21 Secrets 2013. You pay $59 and get to take all the classes. So far, I’m about 1/2 way thru my first class. I just don’t have a lot of free time, but I’m really enjoying it when I get to it. The class is taught by Terri Kahrs. The idea of using a 9×12 inch envelope in my signature came from her. She suggested using it as a journal cover, but I really like having hard covers, so I stick the envelope in my signature. I think it is a really good idea for sticking stuff in.

IMG_3987

Terri introduced us to new methods for making backgrounds, but I really like using a polymer rib (pottery tool) to spread acrylic paint for backgrounds. So after I tried Terri’s methods, I went back to my same old, same old.

The journal covers are 2 layers of mat board. I used ribbon to secure the covers, from the outside, to the signatures and covered the signature stitching with green duct tape.

IMG_3986
Signature spacing.

I like to space out my signatures. Otherwise, once I’m done embellishing my journal, it’s a big thing that won’t close. I don’t like that. So I sew my signatures to card stock that has been reinforced with tulle from my wedding. I had a lot of tulle; it’s going to be a while before I buy other reinforcing material. The card stock and the glued on tulle give the spine strength and toughness.

IMG_3985
Another view of signature spacing.
IMG_3984
Interior view of signature spacing

IMG_3983
Interior cover

I used duct tape on the inside to attach the journal covers to the sewn signatures. You can see it on the envelope side. I covered the interior cover with a piece of paper and painted it all. I primed the pages and the duct tape with gesso.

If I can find my camera, you’ll get to see the spreads.

Book Review

What shall I wear? The what, where, when, and how much of fashionWhat shall I wear? The what, where, when, and how much of fashion by Claire McCardell
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Review of the first edition.

In her day, Claire McCardell was revolutionary. Her idea that fashion should suit the woman was a very new and freeing idea. It’s still a freeing idea, but the first edition is not timeless in the specifics.

I’d say this would be a good book for a collector, but the quality of the paper concerns me. It’s not on acid free paper, and the paper was brittle and becoming very fragile. I don’t know that it will last.

However, if you love Ms. McCardell’s ideas and her fashions, this is a very fun read. It’s definitely worth checking out from the library.

View all my reviews

I’m still thinking about this, so …

I posted this to facebook, but it’s still on my mind.

Alternet.org asked Why Cops Bust Down Doors of Medical Pot Growers, But Ignore Men Who Keep Naked Girls on Leashes?

Why?

1. Low status of women and the cultural view that women are objects for the use of men. The priority that crimes like the one mentionned above get is a reflection of our culture.

2. The money incentive. But I go back to the second sentence of my first point: “The priority that crimes like the one below get is a reflection of our culture.” Whether you want to say it was thru our duly elected officials who reflect our values and culture or whether you want to say that the rich & powerful who control our duly elected officials, it is we who decided this. We are not powerless in this country. We stopped ACTA. But crimes against women?

Until we decide that the objectification of women is not a good cultural value, we aren’t going to change our priorities. If you buy a product that uses the objectification of women in its advertising, you are part of the why. If you support movies, music, and other media that objectify women, you are part of the problem.

If you believe that that is the value of women, then well and good. Be proud of your choices and the way your society treats women and will treat our daughters and granddaughters.