Map Icons

I’m taking a class at Sketchbook Skool: Let’s Make a Map.  The class is taught by Nate Padavick.  He draws way cool maps.

I’m working on a map of Jen & Rob.

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Chorography

Chorography (from χῶρος khōros, “place” and γράφειν graphein, “to write”) is the art of describing or mapping a region or district, and by extension such a description or map. This term derives from the writings of the ancient geographer Pomponius Mela and Ptolemy, where it meant the geographical description of regions. However, its resonances of meaning have varied at different times. Richard Helgerson states that “chorography defines itself by opposition to chronicle. It is the genre devoted to place, and chronicle is the genre devoted to time”. Darrell Rohl prefers a broad definition of “the representation of space or place”. [Wikipedia]

I’m taking a class at Sketchbook Skool: Let’s Make a Map.  The class is taught by Nate Padavick.  He draws way cool maps.

Our first assignment was to draw a compass rose, so here’s mine.

Compass Rose

Places that I was thinking of doing a map of:

  • My Garden
  • The town I grew up in: Piedmont/Oakland
  • The town I live in

but then I saw this image at one of Nate’s sites.  Maybe I’ll do a map of the spaces of Jen & Rob.

Neefer’s Sewing Room

My sewing room still looks like this, pretty much.

Neefer's Sewing Room

The design wall is constructed from 4 bulliten boards mounted on the wall. I covered the boards with a grey flannel fabric. The chest is mostly full of quiting cottons. Supposedly, I put the cutting table away, but since my daughter has taken over my worktable, I haven’t put the cutting table away.

Neefer's Sewing Room

The 2 cupboards contain fashion fabric and some gift wrapping supplies. In theory, when they are full, I stop buying fabric.

Neefer's Sewing Room

The wall cabinets have books, notions, and embellishments. About 2/3s of my patterns are in the tubs under the sewing cabinet. The tubs are the size larger than the shoebox size, and they fit sthe standard pattern very well. A large pattern envelope can lay flat in the boxes, and the ones with the high top lid can accomodate both at once. So far, these tubs are toddler proof.

My husband built the worktable. It’s 41 inches high. I love it. The cutting table is too low, and I get backaches if I’m working at it for extended periods of time. It will be nice when my son is more trustworthy, and I can move my daughter’s stuff off of this table and store things under it again.

Neefer's Sewing Room

My Bernina 1001 sewing machine and Elna 744 serger. I don’t recommend a sewing cabinet like mine. The machines must be available at all times if a busy women is going to be able to sew in 5 or 10 minute bursts. I do like the pnuematic lift under my sewing machine.

Neefer's Sewing Room

The wall mounted ironing board is wonderful when you have small children. I like the full length mirror, too. I secure my iron to the board with a bunge cord.

Neefer's Sewing Room

My Bernina 180E on a desk built by my husband. He bought a ready made countertop and screwed it to two old chestof drawers. This sewing cabinet is much more practical then the expensive fold-away one.

Happy Buphonia

Today is the day to sacrifice a working ox to Zeus, protector of cities (since most of us live in cities …).
 
I’m not sure where I’d get a working ox or 5, but this is how it is supposed to work:
 
A group of oxen was driven forward to the altar at the highest point of the Acropolis. On the altar a sacrifice of grain had been spread by members of the family of the Kentriadae, on whom this duty devolved hereditarily. When one of the oxen began to eat, thus selecting itself for sacrifice,[1] one of the family of the Thaulonidae advanced with an axe, slew the ox, then immediately threw aside the axe and fled the scene of his guilt-laden crime.
 
The slaughter of a laboring ox was forbidden; it was excused in these exceptional circumstances; nonetheless it was regarded as a murder. The axe, therefore, as being polluted by murder, was immediately afterward carried before the court of the Prytaneum, which tried the inanimate object for murder, and, after the water-bearers who lustrated the axe, the sharpeners who sharpened it, the axe-bearer who carried it, each denied in turn responsibility for the deed, the guilty axe or knife was there charged with having caused the death of the ox, for which the axe was acquitted (Pausanias) or the sacrificial knife was thrown into the sea (Porphyry). Apparently this is an early instance analogous to deodand. In the enactment of this comedy of innocence, and the joint feasting of all who participated save the slayer himself, individual consciences were assuaged and the polis was reaffirmed.
 
New words: lustrate and deodand